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4 Ways to Invite Opportunity Into Your Life

Original Post by Gemma Hartley

4 Ways to Invite Opportunity Into Your Life

Spring is when opportunity surrounds us: Plants are blooming and coming into their fullness. Snowmelt and rains bring streams and rivers rushing through their paths. New life is everywhere. Spring is a powerful time to tune in to the nature’s abundance and invite opportunity into your life. Whether that means an unexpected twist in your work life that brings in more wealth, or a new and enlivening relationship that fills your spirit, or even a chance to travel and experience new things, we would all do well to open ourselves to the unknown pleasures the universe has in store for us.

Related: Spring Is the Season of Opportunity—Don’t Waste It

However, we first must do the work of readying ourselves to receive these opportunities. Cultivating abundance, clearing away busy minds and schedules, focusing on gratitude, and committing to curiosity are all key to opening the window that will allow opportunity to shine in. This work is not hard, but it is intentional. Here are four ways to invite opportunity into your life during this season of growth:

1. Cultivate an abundance mindset.

For many of us, having enough never feels like enough because we live with a scarcity mindset—the rug could come out from under us at any second, so we have to hustle and overproduce in order to stay ahead. If you live your life in constant worry that the well is about to run dry, though, you may create a self-fulfilling prophecy (and even if you don’t, you’ll certainly produce a lot of unnecessary anxiety). Instead, start each morning with a mantra that cultivates an abundance mindset. Tell yourself that you live in a world of abundance, that good things are coming your way and that you welcome opportunity with open arms.

2. Clear your mind and your schedule.

We live in a culture that glorifies busy and productive and leaves little room for quiet exploration of self. But those moments of solitude are exactly what you need; if you are hyper-focused on staying busy, opportunities will pass you by. You must let go of the scarcity mindset that tells you constant motion is the only way to find peace and security. You need breathing room to explore what you really want, and clearing your mind and opening your schedule will allow you to make room for the opportunity you most desire into your life.

3. Say thank you.

You might think of thank you notes as something reserved for post-party gratitude, but they can actually be a great way to foster connection. Thank people for sharing their time, their expertise and their experience with you, whether with a handwritten note or an email. Thank people who have influenced your growth. Thank people who have shown up for you during hard times in your life. The act of writing down your gratitude and literally sending it out into the world will help invite opportunity your way. Not only does it remind you to live in a state of gratitude and abundance, but showing your appreciation and interest in others will bring both giver and receiver a tremendous boost in happiness.

4. Get curious.

Do you remember the curiosity you once had in childhood? Do you remember how much your world opened up thanks to that curiosity? A lot. So why do we stop being curious about our world and ourselves? Opportunity loves growth, so if you are doing the same things, thinking about the same things and pursuing the same things day after day, opportunity isn’t likely to come knocking. Allow yourself room to be curious about what truly interests you, and lean into learning more about yourself. It is our job as humans to grow and seek knowledge, and in doing so, we will attract opportunity into our lives.

Young Real Estate Flippers Get Their First Taste of Losing

After piling in when the market was hot, investors are facing losses from homes that take too long to sell.

By Prashant Gopal from Bloomberg.com: https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2019-05-09/young-real-estate-flippers-get-their-first-taste-of-losing

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PHOTO ILLUSTRATION: 731; PHOTO: SHUTTERSTOCK

Sean Pan wanted to be rich, and his day job as an aeronautical engineer wasn’t cutting it. So at 27 he started a side gig flipping houses in the booming San Francisco Bay Area. He was hooked after making $300,000 on his first deal. That was two years ago. Now home sales are plunging. One property in Sunnyvale, near Apple Inc.’s headquarters, left Pan and his partners with a $400,000 loss. “I ate it so hard,” he says.

A new crop of flippers, inspired by HGTV reality shows, real estate meetup groups, and get-rich gurus, piled into the market in recent years as rapid price gains helped the last property crash fade from memory. Many newbie investors are encountering their first slowdown and facing losses from houses that take too long to sell. Meanwhile, they face steep payments on a kind of high-interest debt—known as “hard-money” loans—that helped power the boom.

“Flipping only works in an appreciating market where homes move quickly,” says Glen Weinberg, the Denver-based chief operating officer of Fairview Commercial Lending, which is tightening its standards for real estate investors. “Those factors are now in flux, and that’s what’s going to lead to the demise of a lot of flippers.”

Change in U.S. Home Prices

About 6.5 percent of U.S. sales in the fourth quarter were flips, or homes sold within a year from when they last changed hands. That was the highest share in seasonally adjusted data going back to 2002, according to real estate data firm CoreLogic. (It’s even higher than during the last boom, when there were more newly built houses for buyers to choose from.) Such deals were particularly attractive in Western markets such as Northern California and Seattle, where prices climbed by double-digit percentages annually. But some areas got too hot, and prices are flattening or falling. Fourth-quarter losses for flippers who sold within a year were the highest since 2009, according to a CoreLogic analysis that looks at buying and holding costs, but not rehab expenses. In the San Jose area, 45 percent of flips lost money.

Unlike the last decade’s housing crash, in which speculators bought simply to resell, many of today’s flippers sink money into fixing up properties. Their hard-money loans, which come from private investment groups, often have high interest rates and low down payments. The loans also are bigger because renovation costs are folded in.

Large companies including Blackstone Group LPand Goldman Sachs Group Inc. have gotten into such lending. Competition has helped drive interest rates on some of the loans below 10 percent, says Todd Teta, chief product officer at Attom Data Solutions, a real estate tracker. Now lenders “are easing capital requirements and lengthening loan terms because it’s taking longer to flip homes,” Teta says.

relates to Young Real Estate Flippers Get Their First Taste of Losing
Pan took a big hit on a Silicon Valley fixer-upper.PHOTOGRAPHER: TAYLOR KAY JOHNSON FOR BLOOMBERG BUSINESSWEEK

Many flippers are professionals who’ve been in the business for years. But the latest boom has also lured people such as Rachelle Boyer in Seattle, who got into property investing after attending a $25,000 real estate coaching program. The course taught her to think big, stay positive, and never quit. In 2016 she left a six-figure job and started flipping houses. When demand slumped last year, she fell behind on hard-money loan payments for two houses languishing on the market. She has one more to get rid of. “We will get through the dip. Things are already perking up a bit,” Boyer says. Nevertheless, she’s reconsidering the wisdom of reselling rehabs. Her goal now is to buy 25 houses in Pittsburgh, a cheaper, less volatile market, with a strategy of holding on to the properties as rentals.

Weinberg, the Denver hard-money lender, says he’s increasingly selective with borrowers and deals. He requires flippers to put 40 percent down on a house. But the lenders he competes with are financing purchase and rehab costs with only a small down payment or none at all. The flipper “can go in with no money, his pockets just blowing in the breeze,” he says. “The lenders are going to be left holding the bag.”

The downturn may provide an opportunity by lowering the cost of houses, but buyers have to be able to withstand losses. Bryan Pham, a Bay Area software engineer who also flips houses, has purchased four during the slowdown even as he’s had to put some projects on hold. After the downturn last year, he decided to pay $47,000 extra in loan extensions so he could keep three homes off the market, waiting for spring demand to kick in. Pham estimates he’ll take a $50,000 loss on one home that was listed for $1.1 million and took a month to go under contract. “I’ve seen people make foolish decisions in the past and still make money,” he says. “Now you have to be conservative.”

Pan, the aerospace engineer, is undeterred. He started a blog and podcast about flipping and plans to quit his job to focus on flips full time. He got into property investing after reading Robert Kiyosaki’s financial advice book, Rich Dad, Poor Dad. Pan began scouring online investment forums and attending meetup groups to learn more, but his biggest lesson came last year with the Sunnyvale home. He thought he got a “sweet deal,” negotiating the $2 million asking price down to less than $1.8 million. He and his partners decided to go all out on the remodel. The project took longer than expected, and then the market went soft.

Pan couldn’t afford to wait for a rebound. The holding costs alone for three properties he was trying to dump totaled $30,000 a month. The home sold for less than $1.7 million, or more than $80,000 below what he paid for it. “When you buy these houses, you never think you’ll lose money,” he says. “I fixed it up. It should be worth more, but things change.” —With Patrick Clark and Sydney Maki

BOTTOM LINE – Fueled by high-interest, hard-money loans from private investors, individuals have gotten into real estate speculation again.

Reality TV Show Myths vs. Real Life:

Have you ever been flipping through the channels, only to find yourself glued to the couch in an HGTV binge session? We’ve all been there, watching entire seasons of “Love it or List it,” “Million Dollar Listing,” “House Hunters,” “Property Brothers,” and so many more all in one sitting.

When you’re in the middle of your real estate themed show marathon, you might start to think that everything you see on TV must be how it works in real life, but you may need a reality check.

Reality TV Show Myths vs. Real Life:

Myth #1: Buyers look at 3 homes and decide to purchase one of them.
Truth: There may be buyers who fall in love and buy the first home they see, but according to the National Association of Realtors the average homebuyer tours 10 homes as a part of their search.

Myth #2: The houses the buyers are touring are still for sale.
Truth: Everything is staged for TV. Many of the homes being shown are already sold and are off the market.

Myth #3: The buyers haven’t made a purchase decision yet.
Truth: Since there is no way to show the entire buying process in a 30-minute show, TV producers often choose buyers who are further along in the process and have already chosen a home to buy.

Myth #4: If you list your home for sale, it will ALWAYS sell at the open house.
Truth: Of course, this would be great! Open houses are important to guarantee the most exposure to buyers in your area but are only a PIECE of the overall marketing of your home. Keep in mind that many homes are sold during regular showing appointments as well.

Myth #5: Homeowners decide to sell their homes after a 5-minute conversation.
Truth: Similar to the buyers portrayed on the shows, many of the sellers have already spent hours deliberating the decision to list their homes and move on with their lives/goals.

Bottom Line

Having an experienced professional on your side while navigating the real estate market is the best way to guarantee that you can make the home of your dreams a reality!

What Would Make You Sell Your House?

What Would Make You Sell Your House? | MyKCM

There are many reasons why a homeowner decides to sell their house and move. The latest Generational Trends Report from the National Association of Realtorsasked recent home sellers to share their reason for moving.

The younger the respondents, the more likely their top response centered around needing a larger home (ages 29 to 53). Relocating for a job was the top reason for those ages 54 to 63 and the second most popular response for those under 53. The chart below shows the breakdown for these two reasons.

What Would Make You Sell Your House? | MyKCM

For homeowners over the age of 64, wanting to be closer to friends and family served as the top motivator to move. Downsizing to a smaller home or moving due to retirement came in as a close second and third.

What Would Make You Sell Your House? | MyKCM

Have you outgrown your current house? Are you a homeowner who can relate to wanting to be closer to family and friends? Is your house becoming a burden to clean now that the kids have moved out?

Bottom Line

Let’s get together to set you on the path to selling your current house and finding the home that fits your needs, today!

Data Says…

April is the Best Month to List Your Home for Sale

Data Says April is the Best Month to List Your Home for Sale | MyKCM

The spring housing market is off to the races! The inventory of homes for sale is increasing, buyers are out in force, and interest rates have remained low, piquing the interest of buyers and sellers previously on the fence about making a move.

New research from realtor.com shows that the first week of April is actually the best time to list your house for sale! The report used “trends in median listing prices, views per property on realtor.com, home price drops, median days on market, and number of listings on the market over the last three years,” to determine a ranking for every week of the year.

Listing your home in the first week of April contributes 14x more property views, 5% less competition from other home sellers, and results in the home being sold 6 days faster!

Below is a graph indicating the average score for each month of the year. 

Data Says April is the Best Month to List Your Home for Sale | MyKCM

It should come as no surprise that April and May dominate as the top months to sell. The second quarter of the year (April, May, June) is referred to as the Spring Buyers Season, when competition is fierce to find a dream home, often leading to bidding wars.

However, there is one caveat worth mentioning. When broken down by metro, realtor.com noticed that while warmer climates share an overall trend, they have different top sales months. The best month to get the most exposure in Miami, FL, for instance, is August, while in Phoenix, AZ, June leads the charge.

If you’re thinking of selling your home this year, the time to list is NOW! According to the National Association of Realtors, 41% of homes sold last month were on the market for less than 30 days! If you list now, you’ll have a really good chance to sell in April or May, setting yourself up for the most exposure!

Bottom Line

Let’s get together to discuss the market conditions in our area to get you the most exposure to the buyers ready and willing to make a move!

Is Your House Priced To Sell Immediately (PTSI)?

Is Your House Priced To Sell Immediately (PTSI)? | MyKCM

In today’s real estate market, with more houses coming to market every day and eager buyers searching for their dream home, setting the right price for your house is one of the most important things you can do.

According to CoreLogic’s latest Home Price Indexhome values have risen at over 6% a year over the past two years, but have started to slow to 4.4% over the last 12 months. By this time next year, CoreLogic predicts that home values will be 4.6% higher.

Is Your House Priced To Sell Immediately (PTSI)? | MyKCM

With prices slowing from their previous pace, homeowners must realize that pricing their homes a little OVER market value to leave room for negotiation will actually dramatically decrease the number of buyers who will see their listing! (see the chart below)Instead of the seller trying to ‘win’ the negotiation with one buyer, they should price their house so that demand for the home is maximized. By doing so, the seller will not be negotiating with a buyer over the price, but will instead have multiple buyers competing with each other over the house.

The key to selling your house in 2019 is making sure your house is Priced To Sell Immediately (PTSI)! That way, your home will be seen by the most buyers and will sell at a great price before more competition comes to market!

Bottom Line

If you are debating listing your house for sale, let’s get together to discuss how to price your home appropriately for our area and maximize your exposure this Spring Market!

Exciting News

I have some exciting news to share with you! As you may have heard, Alain Pinel is joining forces with Compass, a national real estate brokerage focused on empowering agents to better serve you.
Alain Pinel’s commitment to the Bay Area community, legacy knowledge of the local market, and decades of experience, combined with Compass’ financial backing, technology infrastructure, and scale, provide important resources, support, and brand reach that we’ll be able to leverage moving forward.
In addition, Compass provides me direct access to a strong network of buyers, sellers, and agents throughout the Bay Area and nationally. The agent network is 10,000 people strong across the top 20 markets in the United States, as well as a global network via Compass’ digital platform, allowing us to reach prospective buyers wherever they live.
Finally, Compass’ agent support is unparalleled. They offer me tools and programs to help me grow my business and better serve my clients, as well as an in-house marketing and creative studio, comprised of designers, strategists, and producers from acclaimed brands and agencies.


2019 IPOs Affecting Real Estate In Silicon Valley

Uber, Lyft, Slack, Pinterest, and Airbnb are predicted to IPO this year which could result in new wealth.

“When tech Unicorn startups, like Uber, finally go public, they will likely be worth over $100 billion, putting at least $10 million in stock for every early employee, advisor, and investor. In addition to the startup ecosystem, the real estate landscape will also be affected.” Read full article in Forbes

2019 Economic & Market Forecast

A glimpse into the data collected by CALIFORNIA ASSOCIATION OF REALTORS®  shows the real estate market is shifting.

Slide1

While area housing supply surged, Los Altos actually decreased in supply.
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Days on market jumped in Los Altos.

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